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Dinosaur discovery: Paleontologists find new sauropod species in Neuquén

The remains came from three separate dinosaurs from the herbivorous group of sauropods, the best known of which are the Diplodocus and Brontosaurus.

Monday 5 November, 2018
Handout picture released by Agencia CTyS (Science, Technology and Society divulgation agency) on November 2, 2018, showing investigators working on the extraction of the remains of three dinosaurs in the Argentine province of Neuquén. A team of Spanish and Argentine paleontologists found the remains of three specimens of a new species of dinosaur with an antiquity of 110 million years.
Handout picture released by Agencia CTyS (Science, Technology and Society divulgation agency) on November 2, 2018, showing investigators working on the extraction of the remains of three dinosaurs in the Argentine province of Neuquén. A team of Spanish and Argentine paleontologists found the remains of three specimens of a new species of dinosaur with an antiquity of 110 million years. Foto:HO / Agencia CTyS / AFP

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A team of Spanish and Argentine paleontologists have discovered the remains of a dinosaur that lived 110 million years ago in the centre of the country, the National University of La Matanza has revealed.

The remains came from three separate dinosaurs from the herbivorous group of sauropods, the best known of which are the Diplodocus and Brontosaurus. This new species has been named Lavocatisaurus agrioensis.

"We found most of the cranial bones: the snout, the jaws, a lot of teeth, also the bones that define the eye sockets for example and, in that way, we were able to create an almost complete reconstruction," said José Luis Carballido, a researcher at the Egidio Feruglio museum and the national council of scientific investigations.

Parts of the neck, tail and back were also found.

"Not only is this the discovery of a new species in an area where you wouldn't expect to find fossils, but the skull is almost complete," added Carballido.

The remains belonged to an adult of around 12 metres (39 feet) in length, and two minors of around six to seven meters.

The paleontologists say the dinosaurs moved around in a group and died together.

"This discovery of an adult and two juveniles also signifies the first record of a group displacement among the rebbachisaurus dinosaurs," said study lead author José Ignacio Canudo of Zaragoza University.

The area in which the fossils were found is unusual for dinosaurs as it would have been a desert with sporadic lakes in that era.

Sauropods were the biggest creatures ever to walk the planet. It is believed that Supersaurus could reach up 33-34 meters in length and Argentinosaurus might have weighed up to 120 tons.

They were herbivorous quadrupeds with long necks and tails, massive bodies and small heads.

But the discovery in Neuquén, published in the scientific journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, remains a huge surprise.

"While one can imagine that this group of sauropods could have adapted to move in more arid environments, with little vegetation, little humidity and little water, it's an area in which you wouldn't be looking for fossils," said Carballido.

- AFP

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