Buenos Aires Times

This Saturday, in the Buenos Aires Times: the death of Alberto Nisman and Argentina's struggle with unregistered workers

Get the english-speaking newspaper along with Diario Perfil.

Tuesday 17 October, 2017
Nisman was found dead on 2015. Investigators still can't find out whether he committed suicide or was murdered.
Nisman was found dead on 2015. Investigators still can't find out whether he committed suicide or was murdered. Foto:Cedoc.

More Argentina News

In this week's Buenos Aires Times, we cover the leaks that have shaken up the investigation into late AMIA special prosecutor Alberto Nisman's death and one of the biggest challenges facing the Mauricio Macri administration: informal labour

The investigation into Nisman's death returned to the fore this week in explosive style, after a leaked report detailing the findings of a team of experts led by the Gendarmerie (Border Guard) revealed that they had concluded that late prosecutor's death may have been a case of murder, not suicide. The leak was timely for both the government and the Gendarmerie, who find themselves under pressure over the disappearance of Santiago Maldonado. The 200-page Nisman report is set to land on the desk of the judge and prosecutor any day now but details have leaked out into the press – we look at their findings and ponder how this will affect the case. 

With around a third of workers nationwide unregistered, economist and environmentalist Fermín Koop walks us through Argentina's informal labour market. With successive governments failing to make headway on the issue and that figure having remained consistent for decades, Koop talks to economic experts to hear their views on whether the issue can truly be tackled – and how. Like his predecessors, President Mauricio Macri has found it hard to tackle the issue, but will major tax and labour overhauls pencilled in for after October's midterms, will the government finally be able to tackle the black economy and roll out reform?

We also cover the biggest stories of the last seven days, including the latest economic news and this week's United Nations General Assembly, as Agustino Fontevecchia asks why President Macri skipped the biggest diplomatic gathering of the year. In our opinion and analysis section, columnists Robert Cox and Andrew Graham-Yooll tackle 'la grieta' and polarisation, bringing their unique historical perspectives to talk of chasms, divisions and rifts. The irrepressible James Neilson, meanwhile, tackles the future of work and prepares for the coming of the robots.

We also travel around Latin America, as we look at the corruption scandals sweeping the region and bring you the latest on the desperate search for survivors in Mexico, after Tuesday's earthquake left nearly 300 dead.

In sport, we look at the form of Argentina's big two, table-topping Boca Juniors and their arch-rivals, River Plate, who thrashed Bolivia's Jorge Wilstermann 8-0 on Thursday night in the Copa Libertadores. In culture, Cristiana Visan looks 'It,' the global blockbuster movie directed by Argentina's very own Andy Muschietti.

Squeeze in our editorial, your letters and more and you have this week's Buenos Aires Times. Out this Saturday, inside your copy of Perfil!

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