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ECONOMY | 12-05-2020 13:17

Education minister says schools in Argentina may re-open in August

Education minister speculates over August return for classes, but says students would go to school only two or three times a week, with a "dual system" of face-to-face teaching and online learning.

Education Minister Nicolás Trotta said Tuesday that schools could re-open in Argentina under a "dual" online/offline system in August.

Trotta, 44, said in a radio interview that "August" is the "stage" that the government's existing plans would allow for a return to school.

He said, however, that classes would not be as before, with a "dual system" of face-to-face teaching and distance learning set to be adopted. He also added that the government would allow one parent to apply for a licence to remain at home and not go to work, in order to assist with childcare responsibilities.

"We're not at a point where we're going back to the classroom. The reality of the pandemic in Argentina is still here," said the national official.

Argentina has been under a mandatory lockdown since March 20, with only some activities allowed to take place.

Trotta said the government would implement a "gradual return" to normality, with a "dual system" of education currently being evaluated, in order to ensure schools are not crowded.

"The ideal scenario would be for students to go to school two or three times a week," said the head of the education portfolio.

Quizzed as to a potential restart date, Trotta responded that "if health permits, one scenario we believe is possible is August."

The minister acknowledged that "one of the challenges we are going to face is how to ensure that there is always an adult at home to accompany a child, not only in terms of care, but also in terms of teaching."

"In those families where both adults have to go to work, it will be necessary to guarantee that one of them can do it from home," he said, implying the government would force businesses and workplaces to accept absences.

- TIMES/NA

 

 

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